Tag Archives: danger

She exhibited a pair of pistols

ROMANCE IN REAL LIFE

This day fortnight an event took place in the shop of a respectable watchmaker in this town which had nearly been attended with a tragical result. The sister of a young lady who once made some stir in this town, respecting a certain hymeneal disappointment, had, it appears, for a long period received visits from the gentleman in question. She either had, or concluded she had reason for believing that the consummation would be matrimony. Suddenly, however, and, as the lady avers, without any reason assigned, the gentleman discontinued his visits. She repeatedly called at his shop and requested to see him, but either by accident or design her wishes in this respect were frustrated. If the shop-boy may be believed she more than once betrayed signs of violent agitation, and exhibited a pair of pistols.

Last Monday week she called at the shop, where she found the gentleman. She asked him if he intended to call at her house. He said no, he did not intend to call any more. At that moment she placed her hand in her pocket, and he heard the click of a pistol-lock. The sound was that of placing the weapon on full cock. She drew the pistol from her pocket, and he rushed towards her and seized it with the intention of disarming her. A struggle ensued, during which the pistol went off. The ball entered the young man’s leg just above the knee, and shattered the bone in a most dreadful manner. She immediately threw away another pistol and rushed from the shop.

The young man took up the pistol which she had thrown away, and, on examining it, found it to be loaded with ball. An application was made to the magistrates last week for a summons against the lady, and the case was heard on Friday. The young man is in a precarious state, and was so ill from the effects of his wound that it was found expedient to have the case heard in the office of the magistrates’ clerks. The above facts were stated, and the young woman was bound over to keep the peace for twelve months.—Liverpool Albion.

The Leicester Chronicle Saturday 30 September 1837

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Filed under Love or Marriage, Violent Episodes

The writer escaped this time

PERILS OF A JOURNALIST.

A writer having attacked vehemently, in a New York journal, a place of dubious reputation in the town, he received in reply to his remarks an anonymous letter advising him to desist from those proceedings, but took no notice of the warning except to continue his literary crusade. A day or two afterwards, as he was sitting in the office of the newspaper, enter to him a ferocious-looking individual armed with a club, and demanding “Where is the editor?”

With considerable presence of mind the receiver of the visit concluded what was the object of his visitor, and asked him to sit down and read the papers while he went in search of the editor. Once out of the room he made for the street door; but here encountered another rough looking stranger also armed with a bludgeon, and demanding in still more furious tones “Where is the editor?” Here the native wit of the New Yorker had a real opportunity for showing itself, and he directed the second intruder to the room he had himself just left, telling him he would find the editor there reading the papers. The result was a tremendous conflict between the two visitors, each of whom was convinced he had to do with an unusually muscular and determined man of letters.

While the struggle was proceeding the intended victim of the agression was quietly bringing the police upon the scene, who, when they arrived, found the combatants quite sufficiently exhausted by their efforts to be easily captured and led off to prison. The incident exemplified once more the superiority of mind over matter and of wit over brute force. But though the writer escaped this time, the affair shows that writing for the Press has its perils in New York.

The Royal Cornwall Gazette Falmouth Packet, Cornish Weekly News, & General Advertiser Friday 2 August 1878

Note: ‘agression’ is shown as in the original


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Filed under Displays of wit, Narrow Escapes, Violent Episodes

Ballooning can never be of practical utility

EXCITING BALLOON ADVENTURE

ANOTHER M.P. IN PERIL

An exciting narrative of ballooning exploit is communicated by Mr. Pendarves Vivian, member for West Cornwall, to the Western Morning News. With two skilled aeronauts he ascended from South-west London, the start being delayed by unfavourable weather until 10 p.m. They found themselves in a strong current, which in ten minutes had placed them over North London, the lights below presenting a fairy scene of indescribable beauty. Though over 1,000 feet high street cries were distinctly audible. Ascending rapidly to 8,000 feet in an hour they found themselves passing at a tremendous rate over a flat country suitable for descending, and they resolved to come down. Gas was let out and grappling irons dropped, when there was a sharp check and violent jerks, and suddenly they commenced soaring upwards at a frightful pace. The rope of the grappling irons had broken. The danger of so helpless a position, especially at night, was instantly apparent, and shortly afterwards a renewed descent was made hoping to run the balloon against some branches of trees.

When this was done one got out, and the two relieved of his weight were carried upwards with extreme velocity to a height of three miles. Half stunned by the shock, and deaf from the rarification of the air, some time elapsed before renewed descent was attempted, when, to their horror, they heard the roaring of the sea immediately below them. Fortunately they found themselves approaching the shore from the sea, over which they had unconsciously been sailing, but had in descending come into a landward current.

Arrived near the ground they struck not twenty yards from from the sea shore, and after dragging several hundred yards, receiving severe concussions from hedges, they simultaneously let go, and the balloon soared aloft leaving them in darkness in an unknown country, subsequently discovered to be ten miles from Lowestoft, having reached there in three hours from London. No permanent injuries were received by the party, but Mr. Vivian’s experience convinced him that ballooning can never be of practical utility as a means of travelling, and that to render ascents approximately safe duplicate grappling irons, with spring buffers and other appliances must be carried.

The Leicester Chronicle and the Leicestershire Mercury, Saturday 31 December 1881

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Filed under Aeronautical Adventures, Narrow Escapes

A Long and Desperate Eight Hours

EXCITING ADVENTURE ON THE MERSEY

Among the hitherto unrecorded incidents of the late storm is one in which a young gentleman hailing from New Brighton had a marvellous escape from death. The young gentleman in question was sleeping in a friend’s yacht which was anchored off New Brighton, and while in his cabin, his vessel received a sudden shock. Going on deck in his night clothing he found that a fishing boat had broke from her moorings, and being carried against his yacht, the two vessels were partially locked together. He promptly jumped on board the fishing vessel to release her from the yacht, but the next instant the storm and the sea had parted the craft, and he found himself drifting about the river in great peril. Realising his danger, and seeing that to control the fishing boat some sail must be hoisted, the young gentleman ran up a slight jib. The wind blowing from the Cheshire side soon carried the yacht into the middle of the river, and then appeared the fate which befel the schooner the same morning—viz. that of being dashed against the north wall and smashed to pieces. After a long and desperate eight hours the tiny craft was drifting safely into the Canada Basin, and the vessel and her solitary crew were saved. The young man, however, was so exhausted from his terrible labours and the exposure that he had to be placed in a hot bath by the dock master, who also supplied him with clothing.

 

The North-Eastern Daily Gazette, Friday 28 December 1894

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Filed under Narrow Escapes

Depredations on the High Seas

This ‘ere post be in honour of International Talk Like a Pirate Day. Hold on to yer eau de Cologne, me fine fellers, for the fearsome fishers o’  Lowestoft wish ter apply it to their fancy whiskers – and if ye step in their way, ye face a roight BUFFETIN’.

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Our gallant life-boat crews have over and over again proved their indomitable bravery during the lamentable storms which have visited the British coasts; but in one or two instances brutal selfishness has, unfortunately, characterised the actions of a few English fishermen. Piracy, it would seem, has, no more than wrecking, died out of the experience and practice of our seafaring population. It was but the other day that we had to record the dishonesty and greed which marked the conduct of the people when the Royal Adelaide was wrecked near Portland. Four Lowestoft fishermen, however, as appears from an inquiry instituted by the Board of Trade, have boldly carried out their depredations to the high seas, boarded a Dutch vessel in the German Ocean, split open the mate’s head, knocked one of the crew into the hold, buffeted the captain on the mouth, and stole a quantity of gin, cigars, tobacco, and eau de Cologne. Three of the enterprising fishers, however, have been discharged, and one alone stands committed for trial.

The Penny Illustrated Paper and Illustrated Times, Saturday 11 January 1873


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A Loud Whiff of Anger

A WOMAN’S EXTRAORDINARY COMBAT WITH AN ALLIGATOR.

Mrs Minnick killing an alligatorMRS. P. J. MINNICK, living on the Hillsboro’ River, in Florida, recently had a contest with a big alligator in which the reptile was despatched. The saurian was chasing ducks when Mrs. Minnick interfered with his fun by a blow on the head with a long pole. Whirling around, with a loud whiff of anger he charged his plucky antagonist. As the alligator charged down with wide-open jaws and shrilly hissing, she braced herself for the fray, and with a quick and sudden movement, she rammed the pole down the reptile’s throat. Mrs. Minnick kept pushing on the pole with all her strength. The reptile snapped at it and tried to bite it off, but could not secure a good hold on it.

Her arms were tiring, and she began calling for help. Her twelve-year-old son soon responded, and came running down the bank with a light axe in his hand. Creeping up close to the alligator, he dealt him a blow on the back with the sharp blade that nearly severed some three feet of the reptile’s tail. The old alligator roared, and with a violent effort bit through the pole in his mouth and endeavoured to retreat to the water. But this Mrs. Minnick was determined he should not do. Catching the axe from her boy’s hands, she rushed up and with one effective stroke cut off one of the alligator’s front paws.

He fell over on his side, roaring and bellowing with rage. His ugly jaws closed together with a vicious snap, and his half-severed tail thrashed around in an ugly manner. Watching her chance, the plucky woman cut off the tail entirely. Shortly after two heavy blows were delivered on the head of the struggling saurian, and the victory was won. The head was cut off and preserved, as Mrs. Minnick says she intends to have a set of jewellery made from its teeth.

The Illustrated Police News Saturday 20 November 1897

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Note: For a British example of  eusuchian-related derring-do, I recommend perusal of the following: An Huzzah for the Reptile Conqueror!

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An Officer of the Guards Nearly Killed at the Royal Wedding

Just before the Royal couple on their journey Citywards were passing Marlborough House the Guards formed into troops across the road. The last troop to wheel into line was headed by the Marquis of Tullibardine, the heir to the Dukedom of Athole. Suddenly the young lieutenant’s horse reared with its forefeet striking the air. A moment more and it had fallen backwards, with its rider beneath. Those near seemed to be paralysed for a moment, and then they rushed forward, but before anybody could reach the unfortunate officer, who, after he fell, had managed to extricate himself from the stirrups, the horse had galloped wildly away, kicking his hind legs in the air. There was nothing, so far as one could tell, between it and the Royal carriage, just then entering the yard, except a stray policeman or two. A moment of breathless suspense, and a policeman rushed out into the roadway, and caught the horse by the bridle just in the nick of time, and Lord Tullibardine was carried across the road and laid on an ambulance couch as the Royal carriage came by. If, as is possible, the Duke and his Duchess thought their reception somewhat cold at this point, this is the explanation. The hinder squadron of Guards having passed, the attention of all present, momentarily abstracted, was turned to the gallant young Guardsman stretched under the arches of St James’s Palace, where the ambulance corps were doing their best to revive him. They were successful after a time, and the poor fellow with a faint smile was able to tell the surgeon when he arrived that he was “all right,” though his spine hurt him. Then he was tenderly lifted onto an ambulance and carried to Mr. Kingcote’s apartments in the palace, where the surgeon attended him. The man who stopped the horse in so gallant a manner was Walter Peacock, 39 B R.

The Illustrated Police News Saturday 15 July 1893

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Filed under Birds and Beasts, Narrow Escapes, Royal Goings-on