Tag Archives: Liverpool

She exhibited a pair of pistols

ROMANCE IN REAL LIFE

This day fortnight an event took place in the shop of a respectable watchmaker in this town which had nearly been attended with a tragical result. The sister of a young lady who once made some stir in this town, respecting a certain hymeneal disappointment, had, it appears, for a long period received visits from the gentleman in question. She either had, or concluded she had reason for believing that the consummation would be matrimony. Suddenly, however, and, as the lady avers, without any reason assigned, the gentleman discontinued his visits. She repeatedly called at his shop and requested to see him, but either by accident or design her wishes in this respect were frustrated. If the shop-boy may be believed she more than once betrayed signs of violent agitation, and exhibited a pair of pistols.

Last Monday week she called at the shop, where she found the gentleman. She asked him if he intended to call at her house. He said no, he did not intend to call any more. At that moment she placed her hand in her pocket, and he heard the click of a pistol-lock. The sound was that of placing the weapon on full cock. She drew the pistol from her pocket, and he rushed towards her and seized it with the intention of disarming her. A struggle ensued, during which the pistol went off. The ball entered the young man’s leg just above the knee, and shattered the bone in a most dreadful manner. She immediately threw away another pistol and rushed from the shop.

The young man took up the pistol which she had thrown away, and, on examining it, found it to be loaded with ball. An application was made to the magistrates last week for a summons against the lady, and the case was heard on Friday. The young man is in a precarious state, and was so ill from the effects of his wound that it was found expedient to have the case heard in the office of the magistrates’ clerks. The above facts were stated, and the young woman was bound over to keep the peace for twelve months.—Liverpool Albion.

The Leicester Chronicle Saturday 30 September 1837

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Filed under Love or Marriage, Violent Episodes

A Long and Desperate Eight Hours

EXCITING ADVENTURE ON THE MERSEY

Among the hitherto unrecorded incidents of the late storm is one in which a young gentleman hailing from New Brighton had a marvellous escape from death. The young gentleman in question was sleeping in a friend’s yacht which was anchored off New Brighton, and while in his cabin, his vessel received a sudden shock. Going on deck in his night clothing he found that a fishing boat had broke from her moorings, and being carried against his yacht, the two vessels were partially locked together. He promptly jumped on board the fishing vessel to release her from the yacht, but the next instant the storm and the sea had parted the craft, and he found himself drifting about the river in great peril. Realising his danger, and seeing that to control the fishing boat some sail must be hoisted, the young gentleman ran up a slight jib. The wind blowing from the Cheshire side soon carried the yacht into the middle of the river, and then appeared the fate which befel the schooner the same morning—viz. that of being dashed against the north wall and smashed to pieces. After a long and desperate eight hours the tiny craft was drifting safely into the Canada Basin, and the vessel and her solitary crew were saved. The young man, however, was so exhausted from his terrible labours and the exposure that he had to be placed in a hot bath by the dock master, who also supplied him with clothing.

 

The North-Eastern Daily Gazette, Friday 28 December 1894

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Filed under Narrow Escapes

A Wasteful Individual

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EXTRAORDINARY INCIDENT IN A LIVERPOOL TELEGRAPH OFFICE

A few days ago a gentleman entered a Liverpool telegraph office, and taking some forms down, filled them up as fast as he could. Having used all he had he asked for more, and did likewise till those were used up. From the number he had filled up and from his asking for more, and more, and yet more, the clerks naturally concluded that he was going to give them a wholesale order for stamps, and monopolise the wires for an hour or two. At length this man of energy rose with the bundle in his hands, and approaching the clerk asked him for a sixpenny stamp. The clerk wanted to know what all the others were. He replied that he had only used them to fix in the wording of the message he had to send. Thereupon the clerk took the pile and counted, only to find that this individual had wasted 146 forms in trying to word a message within the prescribed value of 6d. Thereupon the clerk demanded his name and address, and stated that the Postmaster General should be informed of this wilful waste. After communicating with St. Martin’s-le-Grand, and search being made for the individual, he had “gone—no address.” This is probably the largest number of forms ever used to write a message of twelve words.

The Dundee Courier and Argus, Wednesday 23 August 1893

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Filed under Peculiar Behaviour